Common errors in English: Usage of Get Yourself Admitted.

 Get yourself admitted


Incorrect : He took admission in English. 


Correct . He got himself admitted in English. 

Or He admitted himself in English. Or He enrolled in English.


Note: "Get oneself admitted' is a formal expression. The usual word is now ‘enroll'.

Common errors in English: Usage of Be Born.

Be born


Incorrect : He took his birth in 1960. 


Correct : He was born in 1960.


Note: Nobody can take a birth. You should express the idea of being born in the passive voice. 


For example:

Five babies are born every minute in Bangladesh. 

Many babies will be born tomorrow.


However, a mother can give birth to a baby. You can say: 


She gave birth to a fine baby.

Or She bore/has borne three children.

Common errors in English: Usage of Marry Someone off.

 Marry someone off 


Incorrect : He gave her daughter marriage. 


Correct : He married off her daughter.


Note: “To marry someone off” means “to find a husband or wife for them.”

Common errors in English: Usage of Marry Or Get Married.

 “Marry” or “Get married”


Incorrect : I shall do you marriage. 


Correct : I shall marry you.


Incorrect : He will do marriage next week. 


Correct : He is going to marry next week. Or He's getting married next week.


Note: ''Get married' is more usual than “marry”.

Common errors in English: Usage of To mean The English Name.

To mean the English name


Incorrect : How do you call this in English? 


Correct : What do you call this in English?


Note: If the question is about an expression, you can Say: 


How do you say this in English?


This question is not about a thing.

Common errors in English: Usage of To mean Place Of Residence.

To mean place of residence


Incorrect : Where is your home? 


Correct : Where are you from? Or Where do you come from?


Note: You cannot say, "Where are you coming from?" to mean “Where are you from?”

Common errors in English: Usage of What is The Matter?

What is the matter? 


Incorrect : What have you today? 


Correct : What is the matter with you today?


Note: It is also possible to say:

What's wrong with you? Or What's the trouble with you? 

Common errors in English: Usage of This Morning.

 This morning


Incorrect : He phoned me today morning. 


Correct : He phoned me this morning.


Note: Similarly, you should use ‘this afternoon' for “today afternoon”, “this evening” for “today evening', 'last night for "yesterday night' and "tonight' for 'today night” or 'this night’.

Common errors in English: Usage of Put On/Lose Weight.

 Put on/Lose weight


Incorrect : His weight has increased. 


Correct : His has put on weight.


Incorrect : She has decreased her weight. 


Correct : She has lost her weight. 


Note: “To put on weight" means “to get fatter" and "to lose weight' means "to get thinner'. The opposite of "put on weight' cannot be “take off weight'.

Common errors in English: Usage of Glasses.

 Glasses


Incorrect : He wears glass for reading. 


Correct : He wears glasses for reading.


Incorrect : Where is my glass? 


Correct : Where are my glasses?


Incorrect : I need a new glass. 


Correct : I need some new glasses. Or I need a new pair of glasses.


Note: When "glasses" refers to "spectacles', it is always plural; it has no singular form.

Common errors in English: Usage Of Have a Haircut.

 Have a haircut 


Incorrect : I am going to cut my hair. 


Correct: I am going to have my hair cut. Or I am going for a haircut.


Note: We do not cut our hair ourselves. We usually have it cut by a hairdresser.

Common errors in English: Usage of Lose/Gain Time.

Lose/Gain time


Incorrect : My watch is slow/fast every day. 


Correct : My Watch loses/gains time every day.


Note: When a watch loses time, it gets slower and when it gains time, it gets faster.

Common errors in English: Usage of Set a Watch.

Set a watch


Incorrect: I have righted my watch with the radio. 


Correct: I have set my watch by the radio.


Note: This means that I put my watch to the right time listening to the radio time signal.

Common errors in English: Usage of Read The Watch.

Read the watch


Incorrect : He does not know how to See the watch. 

Correct : He does not know how to read the watch.


Note: “to read the watch” means “to be able to tell the time by looking at a watch.”

Common errors in English: Usage of Turn On/Off.

Turn on/off


Incorrect : Please leave/shut the light. 


Correct : Please turn on/off the light. Or Please turn the light on/off.


Note: You can also say 'switch on/off the light'. But when we refer to a lamp or candle, we should say:


Please light the lamp/candle. 

Please blow/put out the lamp/ candle.


Similarly:


Incorrect : Open your dress. 

Correct : Take off your dress. Or Take your dress off.

Common errors in English: Usage of Tell/Speak The Truth.

 Tell/Speak the truth


Incorrect : You should always say the truth. 


Correct : You should always tell/speak the truth. 


Incorrect : Don't say/speak a lie. 


Correct : Don't tell a lie.


Note: Both "tell" and "speak” can be used before “truth" but only “tell' should be used before "a lie.”

Common errors in English: Usage of Make a mistake.

Make a mistake


Incorrect : He has done a lot of spelling mistakes in the essay.


Correct : He has made a lot of spelling mistakes in the essay.

Common errors in English: Usage of Smoke a Ciggarette.

 Smoke a cigarette


Incorrect . He drinks/eats about twenty cigarettes a day. 


Correct . He smokes about twenty cigarettes a day.


Note: A cigarette cannot be eaten or drunk. It can only be smoked.

Common errors in English: Usage of Have a dream.

Have a dream


Incorrect : He saw a dream last night. 


Correct : He had/dreamt a dream last night.


Note: Seeing a dream is not good idiomatic English. But this expression is often seen now-a-days.

Common errors in English: Usage of Say/Offer.

Say/offer  


Incorrect : Muslims read prayers five times a day. 


Correct : Muslims say/offer prayers five times a day.


Note: English does not allow the expression "reading a prayer."

Common errors in English: Usage of Give/Deliver.

 Give/Deliver


Incorrect . He made an interesting lecture. 


Correct : He gave/delivered an interesting lecture.


Note: But “make” can be used before 'speech'. 


We can Say:

He gave/delivered/made an interesting speech.

Common errors in English:Usage of Ask and Make.

 Ask and Make


Incorrect : She did/made me several questions. 


Correct . She asked me several questions. 


Incorrect : She did me a request. 


Correct : She made me a request. 


Note: In English, you cannot do or make a question to anyone but you can make a request. "Doing a request” is not an idiomatic expression.

Common errors in English: Usage of Take/Have a bath.

 Take/Have a bath


Incorrect : I do/make a bath every morning. 


Correct : I take/have a bath every morning.


Note: “Have a bath” is British English and “take a bath” is American English. But "do a bath' is not an English expression. 


We can also say:

She is giving a bath to her baby.


“Bath” and “bathe" can also be used as a verb in two senses. 


For example:

He baths/bathes every morning (intransitive) 

She baths/bathes her baby every day (transitive)

Common errors in English: Usage of On foot.

On foot


Incorrect: We went there with the feet. Or, We went there on our feet. 


Correct : We went there on foot.


Note: "On foot' is a fixed phrase which means "by walking”.

Common errors in English: Usage of Get On and Get Off.

 Get on, Get off


Incorrect : He climbed the bus. 


Correct : He got on the bus.


Incorrect : She came down from the bus. 


Correct : She got off the bus.


Note: "To climb' means "to go up towards the top of”. Therefore, we can climb a hill, a tree etc but not a vehicle. On the other hand, we can “alight from', "get out of', 'get down from' or 'get off’ a vehicle.

Common errors in English: Usage of Take/Have a walk.

 Take/Have a walk


Incorrect : We made/gave a walk along the river bank. 


Correct : We took/had a walk along the river bank. 


Note: You can also say, "We went for a walk along the river bank.'

Common errors in English: Usage of Busy.

 Busy


Incorrect : I have much work today. 


Correct : I am very busy today. 


Note: It is also possible to say, "I have a lot of work to do today.”

Common errors in English: Usage of Take and Give.

“Take” and “Give”


Incorrect : The students are giving their examination. 


Correct : The students are taking their examination.


Incorrect : Our teacher will take our exam tomorrow. 


Correct : Our teacher will give us an exam tomorrow.


Note: In case of examinations, “take' means "sit for” or "appear at' and "give” means "hold” or "set".

Therefore, teachers give an examination and students take it.

Common errors in English: Usage of Idiomatic English.

 “Idiomatic English” means that kind of English which is spoken by the native speakers of English. Any expression which does not conform to the idiomatic English is called "Unidiomatic”. A non-native speaker of English is often influenced by his/her mother tongue and uses expressions which are not typically English. People usually make the following mistakes.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past Perfect Before/when.

 Past Perfect + before/when


Incorrect : I had reached the school till the rain started. 


Correct : I had reached the school before/when the rain started.


Note: The adverbial clause of time is introduced by the subordinator “before” or “when” if the main clause denotes an action completed before that of the time clause.

Common errors in English: Usage of And or Or

 ‘And’ or ‘Or’?


Incorrect : He did not speak loudly and clearly. 


Correct : He did not speak loudly or clearly.


Note: You can say "He spoke loudly and clearly”. But if a negator is used in a sentence, the conjunction “and” should be replaced by "or". However, if clauses with different subjects are joined in a sentence, the conjunction "and" may be used in a negative sentence in this way: 


She did not respond to my letter, and I did not feel good at all. 


In this case, a comma is necessary before “and”.

Common errors in English: Usage of "Either" In negatives.

“Either” in negatives


Incorrect : Alan has not done the work too/also. 


Correct : Alan has not done the work either.


Note: "Also" and "too" are not usually used in negative sentences. In negatives they both are changed into "either".

Common errors in English: Usage of Both and Neither.

Both and Neither 


Incorrect : Both of them did not survive the accident. 


Correct : Both of them survived the accident. Or Neither of them survived the accident.


Note: The word “both” cannot be used in a negative sentence. It changes into “neither' in negatives.

Common errors in English: Usage of Either....or,Neither...nor.

 Either...or, Neither...nor


Incorrect : I will take neither tea or coffee. 


Correct : I will take neither tea nor coffee.


Incorrect : You can take either this one nor that one.


Correct : You can take either this one or that one.


Note: You must remember that “either' is followed by “or” and “neither” is followed by “nor”.

Common errors in English: Usage of Logical subject and Logical Verb.

 Logical Subject + Logical verb


Incorrect : The film likes me very much. 


Correct : The film appeals to me very much. Or, I like the film very much.


Note: “The film appeals to me' means that I like it very much. A film cannot like or dislike a person.

Common error in English: Usage of Either and any.

 Either, Any


Incorrect : Any of these two books is good. 


Correct : Either of these two books is good.


Incorrect : Either of these three pens will do. 


Correct : Any of these three pens will do.


Note: "Either' means one or the other of two persons or things. And "any" means one of three or more persons or things. So "any" should not be used when two persons or things are involved and "either' should not be used when more than two persons or things are involved. The negative of “any' is “none" and that of "either" is “neither". 


For example:

Neither of the two books is good. 

None of these three books is good.

Common errors in English: Usage of Whether.

Whether


Incorrect : I could not decide if to go there. 


Correct : I could not decide whether to go there.


Incorrect : It depends on if he is ready or not. 


Correct : It depends on whether he is ready or not.


Incorrect : It is your decision if you go or stay. 


Correct : It is your decision whether you go or stay.


Incorrect : I asked him if he was coming or not. 


Correct : I asked him whether he was coming or not. Or I asked him whether or not he was coming.


Note: “If” and “whether" are sometimes interchangeable. 


For example, we can say:

He asked me if/whether she was coming.


But we must use only 'whether' before infinitives, after prepositions, after nouns and with "or not". In these cases “whether' cannot be replaced by “if”.

Common errors in English: Usage of In the country.

 In the country


Incorrect : We spent our holiday in a country. 


Correct : We spent our holiday in the country.


Note: "A country” refers to an area of land like Bangladesh, India or Pakistan. But "the country” refers to the land outside cities or towns in a country. It stands for the rural area.

Common errors in English: Usage of The reason is that.

The reason is that


Incorrect: The reason is because he is ill today. 


Correct : The reason is that he is ill today.


Note: The word "reason” denotes cause. Therefore, the expression "the reason is because” is a useless repetition. The correct idiom is the reason is that....”

Common errors in English: Usage of In the rain and In the sun etc.

 In the rain, In the sun etc.


Incorrect : They are playing football under the rain. 


Correct : They are playing football in the rain.


Incorrect: Don't run under the sun. 


Correct : Don't run in the Sun.


Incorrect : The man is sitting under the shade. 


Correct : The man is sitting in the shade.


Note: “Under the rain” or “Under the shade” does not make any sense. "Under the Sun' is a phrase which means "at all". It is usually used to give force to an expression. 


For example: 

I am the last person under the sun to accept this proposal.

Common errors in English: Usage of In the end.

In the end 


Incorrect : At the end they found the dead body.


Correct : In the end they found the dead body.


Note: The two phrases “at the end” and ‘in the end' have two different meanings and are not, therefore, interchangeable. “In the end” means "finally” or "at last”, whereas “at the end” means "at the farthest point or part'. 


We can say: 

The hero and the heroine were united in marriage at the end of the film and in the end they were happy.

Common errors in English: Usage of As usual.

 As Usual


Incorrect: As usually, he arrived late. 


Correct : As usual, he arrived late.


Note: The phrase "as usual" means "as is usual/common or has happened before” “As usually' is not a phrase at all. We can, however, use only "usually” to mean "in most cases” or "generally”. 


For example:

I usually go to bed at 11 o'clock.

Common errors in English: Usage of Hopefully and future.

Hopefully + future


Incorrect : Hopefully he passed the exam. 


Correct : Hopefully he will pass the exam.


Note: The meaning of “hopefully' is “if our hopes succeed’ and, therefore, it should be used with the future tense. This expression is now very common, especially in spoken English.

Common errors in English: Usage of Half and A half.

 Half, A half


Incorrect : He came here at seven and a half. 


Correct . He came here at half past Seven.


Incorrect : I took half past two hours to do the work. 


Correct : I took two hours and a half to do the Work.


Note: In telling time, we use the expressions “half past one', 'half past two’ etc. to mean 1.30, 2.30 etc. But when we refer to a duration or length of time, we use ‘one and a half hours' to mean 'one hour and thirty minutes."

Common errors in English: Usage of Some day and One day.

 Some day/One day


Incorrect: I shall go there the other day. 


Correct : I shall go there some day/one day.


Note: "Some day' or “one day' means "at some time in the future' but "the other day' means “in the recent past'. So the phrase "the other day' cannot be used with a future tense. 


You can say:

I saw him the other day.

Common errors in English: Usage of One day and One afternoon.

One day, One afternoon


Incorrect: I met her a day in June. 


Correct : I met her one day in June.


Incorrect : He saw me an afternoon in July. 


Correct : He saw me one afternoon in July.


Note: “One' cannot be replaced by “a” or "an" when it means 'a certain'. In this sense "a/an' cannot be used with day, night, morning, afternoon, and evening.

Common errors in English: Usage of once and twice

 Once, Twice


Incorrect : I visited the place only one time or two times. 


Correct : I visited the place only once or twice.


Note: The expressions "one time' and “two times” are not used. Instead, we use “once' and “twice'. But the word “thrice' for “three times' is out-dated. However, 'at one time” means "formerly'. 

For example: 

At one time they were very close friends.


"At one time” can also be replaced by "once'. 


We can say:

Once they were very good friends.

Common errors in English: Usage of Double negative.

Double Negatives


Incorrect : He is not afraid of nobody. 


Correct: He is not afraid of anybody. Or He is afraid of nobody.


Note: Two negatives in the same clause produce a positive meaning. Therefore, two negatives in the same clause should be avoided. When, “not” is used, “nothing" changes to “anything”, “nobody” to "anybody', 'no one' to "anyone' and "nowhere' to “anywhere'. 


For example: 

I know nothing. 

I do not know anything.

They have nothing to say. 

They do not have anything to say.

He was found nowhere. 

He was not found anywhere.

Common errors in English: Usage of Infinitive of purpose.

Infinitive of Purpose 


Incorrect : He went there for learning English. 


Correct . He went there to learn English.


Note: The purpose of an action is usually expressed by the infinitive, and not by the gerund. “For + gerund” usually expresses a cause. 


For example:

He was punished for telling a lie.

Common errors in English: Usage of Appropriate question tag.

 Appropriate tag question


Incorrect : You have read the book, isn't it? 


Correct : You have read the book, haven't you?



Incorrect . It is raining very hard, doesn't it? 


Correct . It is raining very hard, isn't it? 


Note: In the tag question, the same tense and person must be used as in the preceding statement and the auxiliary or principal verb must be used. 


For example: 

He is a teacher, isn't he? 


Here 'is' is a principal verb. If the statement does not contain any ‘be’ verb or auxiliary verb, an appropriate form of 'do' is used in the tag. 


For example: 

He went there, didn’t he? 

She works here, doesn’t she?


Remember that the subject of the tag question is always a pronoun.

Common errors in English: Dangling modifier

 Dangling Modifier


Incorrect : Being in haste, the door was left open. 


Correct : Being in haste, he left the door open.


Note: In the first sentence here the participle phrase “Being in haste” is a dangling modifier which is not properly related to the subject. It suggests that the door was in haste. Such illogical things should be avoided. A logical subject should, therefore, be provided to connect the modifier and the modified appropriately.

Common errors in English: Usage of would and past tense.

Intransitive verbs cannot be used in the passive


Incorrect : She was disappeared from the house. 


Correct : She disappeared from the house.


Incorrect : An accident was happened there. 


Correct : An accident happened there.


Incorrect : The tragedy was occurred only minutes after take-Off. 


Correct : The tragedy occurred only minutes after take-off.


Note: "Disappear”, “happen' and "occur' are intransitive verbs. Such verbs cannot be used in the passive voice.

Common errors in English: Usage of Easy,Difficult and to infinitive.

 “Easy”, “Difficult” + to-infinitive


Incorrect : English is not easy to be learnt. 


Correct : English is not easy to learn.


Incorrect : This sum is difficult to be done. 


Correct : This sum is difficult to do.


Incorrect : The problem is hard to be solved. 


Correct : The problem is hard to solve.


Note: The adjectives “easy”, 'difficult', 'hard', 'heavy', “good” etc are usually followed by the active infinitive (to + base form of a verb), not by the passive infinitive (to + be + past participle form of a verb).

Common errors in English: Usage of Home and Aboard as adverb.

 “Home”, “Abroad” as adverbs


Incorrect: He went to home yesterday. 


Correct : He went home yesterday.


Incorrect : I went to abroad several times. 


Correct : I went abroad several times.


Note: Some words like "home” and "abroad” are used directly as adverbs. Therefore, no preposition is necessary before them. 


Similarly, we can also say:

We live upstairs/downstairs. 

He drove uptown/downtown.


But look at the following two sentences:


Incorrect : He came my home. 


Correct : He came to my home.


Here ‘my home’ is a noun phrase which cannot be used as an adverbial without a preposition before it.

Common errors in English: Usage of Better/worse,Best/worst.

Better/worse, Best/Worst


Incorrect : My pen is more good/bad than yours.


Correct : My pen is better/worse than yours.


Incorrect : He is the goodest/baddest boy in the class. 


Correct : He is the best/worst boy in the class.


Note: The comparative and superlative forms of "good' are "better' and "best” respectively, whereas those of 'bad' are “worse' and 'worst'. These two adjectives have irregular forms of comparison.

Common errors in English: Usage of Comparison between similar things.

 Comparison between similar things


Incorrect: His pen is better than me. 


Correct : His pen is better than mine.


Note: In the first sentence here, his pen is compared with me as a person. Such a comparison is absurd. A pen can be compared with another pen. In the second sentence "mine' means 'my pen'. 


Similarly:

Incorrect : The mangoes of  Alan are better than Selena. 

Correct : The mangoes of Alan are better than those of Selena.

Common errors in English: Usage of Superior and to.

 Superior + to 


Incorrect : This book is superior than that. 


Correct : This book is superior to that.


Note: Although two books are compared here, the adjective "superior” is not followed by “than”. It is always followed by “to”. Like “superior”, “inferior”, “senior” and "junior” are also followed by “to”. 


For example:

These mangoes are inferior to those mangoes. 

He is senior/junior to me by two years.

Common errors in English: Usage of Taller/Harder and Than.

Taller/Harder + than


Incorrect: Zinnia is taller from her mother. 


Correct : Zinnia is taller than her mother.


Incorrect : He works harder from me. 


Correct : He works harder than me.


Note: The comparative form of an adjective or adverb is always followed by the preposition “than” and not by “from”.

Common errors in English: Usage of Superlative degree.

Superlative Degree


Incorrect : Dhaka is the larger city in Bangladesh.


Correct : Dhaka is the largest city in Bangladesh.


Note : When more than two things are compared, you must use the superlative degree.

Common errors in English: Usage of Comparative degree.

Comparative Degree


Incorrect . Of the two books this one is the best. 


Correct : Of the two books this one is the better.


Incorrect : Alan is the tallest of the two boys. 


Correct : Alan is the taller of the two boys.


Note : When we compare two persons or things, we must use the comparative degree, not the superlative.

Common errors in English: Usage of Each other.

Each other


Incorrect : Each other love Reza and Rina. 


Correct : Reza and Rina love each other.


Note: "Each other” cannot be used as the subject of a sentence. Formerly, "each other” was used when two people were involved and “one another” was used when more than two people were involved. But many writers now do not observe this distinction and use these two expressions interchangeably when two or more people are involved. 


We can also say:

All the members of the family love each other/one another.

Common errors in English: Usage of Another.

 Another


Incorrect: Please give me one other book. 


Correct : Please give me another book. Or Please give me one more book. 


Note : The word “another" consists of “an” and “other". But instead of being written “an other” or “one other”, they are written as a single word.

Common errors in English: Usage of Cannot.

 Cannot


Incorrect : He can not do this work. 


Correct : He cannot do this work.


Note : "Can” and “not” are never written separately. They are always written together to form a single word. This is an exceptional negative modal. Other one word negative modals are in the contracted forms only (e.g. won't, shan’t etc.)- 

Common errors in English: Usage of Interrogative pronoun Which.

 ‘Which’ as Interrogative pronoun


Incorrect : Who of the two girls is the taller? 


Correct: Which of the two girls is the taller?


Note : The interrogative pronoun "which” refers to both persons and things and asks for one out of a definite number. The pronouns “who” and “what” do not imply any choice. 


For example:

Who is going there? 

What is your telephone number?

Common errors in English: Usage of One and One's.

One + one's


Incorrect . One should do his/her duty. 


Correct : One should do one's duty.


Note: 'One' is an indefinite pronoun and it must be followed by one or its parts (one, one's, oneself), and not by he, she or their parts. It is better not to use 'one' as subject.

Common errors in English: Usage of Such and as.

 Such + as


Incorrect : He is such a man that can be trusted. 


Correct : He is such a man as can be trusted.


Incorrect : He wears the same dress which I wear. 


Correct : He wears the same dress as I wear.


Note: The words "such” and "same" are usually followed by "as". However, “that” can sometimes be used after “same”. 


For example, it will not be incorrect to say :

He wears the same dress that I wear.

Common errors in English: Usage of Relative pronoun after superlative degree Whom and which.

 Relative Pronoun after Superlative Degree


Incorrect : She is the best singer whom I have ever seen. 


Correct : She is the best singer (that) I have ever seen.


Incorrect . This is the best book which he has ever written. 


Correct : This is the best book (that) he has ever written. 


Note: The relative pronouns who, whom and which cannot be used after the superlative degree. You can use the relative pronoun that after a superlative. But in most cases this relative pronoun is omitted.

Common errors in English: Usage of Relative pronoun as subject whom.

Relative Pronoun as Subject


Incorrect: I saw the man whom you said came here yesterday.


Correct : I saw the man who you said came here yesterday.


Note: In this sentence ‘who’ is the subject of the verb ‘came’. ‘You said’ is a parenthetic clause. However, in informal English ‘who’ can also be used as an object. 


For example: 

Who(m) do you want? 

This is the boy who(m) you asked to come.

Common errors in English: Usage of Relative pronoun That.

Relative pronoun ‘that’


But there are certain antecedents which cannot be followed by the relative pronoun ‘which’. 


For example:


Incorrect : I know all which he said. 


Correct : I know all that he said. Or I know all he said. 


The relative pronoun ‘that’ in this case may also be omitted. Other antecedents like ‘all’ include some, any, something, everything, anything, nothing etc. 


For example, we can say: 

Everything (that) he is saying is false. 

You can take anything (that) you like.

Common errors in English: Usage of Relative pronoun which and who.

 Relative pronouns


Incorrect : I know the man which came here. 


Correct : I know the man who/that came here.


Incorrect: I killed the rat who disturbed me. 


Correct : I killed the rat which/that disturbed me.


Note: The relative pronoun ‘who’ refers to persons only. However ‘that’ can refer to all kinds of antecedents - both persons and things/animals. Remember, the same relative pronoun can refer to both singular and plural antecedents. 


For example:

I know the girl/girls who/that came here. 

I have lost the book/books which /that you gave me.

Common errors in English: Usage of Cognate objects Play and Danced.

Cognate object


Incorrect : Mitul played a good play. 


Correct : Mitul played a good game.


Incorrect : Zinnia danced a good dance. 


Correct : Zinnia had/did a good dance.


Note: The use of a cognate object (an object similar in meaning to the verb before it) is not very frequent. It is restricted only to a few expressions. 


For example, we can say:

They fought a good fight.

He died a noble death.

She sang a sweet song.

I slept a sound sleep.

He dreamt a strange dream.

They lived a happy life.

Common errors in English: Usage of Himself and Myself.

Himself, Myself etc


Incorrect : He hurt his self. 


Correct : He hurt himself.


Incorrect : I meself will talk to him. 


Correct : I myself will talk to him.


Note: The formation of all reflexive pronouns does not follow the same rule. The structure of the first and second person reflexive pronoun is ‘possessive + self’ (i.e. my/your + self or our/your + selves), But the third person reflexive pronouns are formed by adding self or selves to the object form of the simple pronoun (i.e. him + self = himself, them + selves = themselves etc.) In the pronoun ‘herself’, ‘her’ is the object form, not the possessive form.

Common errors in English: Usage of Noun/pronoun and self pronoun.

 Noun/Pronoun + “self” pronoun


Incorrect : Alan and myself were present there. 

Correct : Alan and I were present there.


Incorrect: Himself was responsible for the accident.


Correct . He himself was responsible for the accident.


Note: ‘Self’ pronouns are not used alone. They are always used with their simple forms. They are used in two ways: (1) for emphasis and (2) reflexively. 


For example: 

You yourself have done it. (emphatic)

She hurt herself. (reflexive)


In either case, the ‘self’ forms follow their simple forms.

Common errors in English: Usage of Double Possessive of mine.

Double possessive (of + mine etc)


Incorrect : He is a friend of me. 


Correct . He is a friend of mine.


Incorrect : A friend of you told me the news. 


Correct : A friend of yours told me the news.


Note : When we want to emphasize the person who possesses rather than the thing which s/he possesses, we usually use the double possessive (of + mine/yours etc.). Here the general rule (that a preposition is followed by an object form of noun or pronoun) is violated. "A friend of yours' actually means “One of your friends.”

Common errors in English: Usage of Determiner and gerund.

 Determiner + Gerund


Incorrect : There is no use in me learning it. 


Correct : There is no use in my learning it.


Incorrect : There is no reason for you going there. 


Correct : There is no reason for your going there.


Note : When the present participle form of a verb is used as noun ( = gerund), any noun or pronoun coming before it must be in the possessive case. In the examples above, ‘my’ and ‘your’ are used as determiners.

Common errors in English: Usage of Preposition and pronoun(object form).

Preposition + pronoun (object form)


Incorrect . It is a secret between you and I. 


Correct : It is a secret between you and me.


Incorrect : I am senior to he. 


Correct : I am senior to him.


Note: In these sentences, ‘between’ and ‘to’ are prepositions. You should remember that all prepositions are followed by the object form of pronouns. The nominative case cannot be used after a preposition.

Common errors in English: Usage of Than(conjunction) and clause.

 Than (conjunction) + clause 


Incorrect : He is taller than me. 


Correct : He is taller than I (am).


Note: The word ‘than’ is a conjunction and hence should be followed by a clause beginning with the subject form of a pronoun. The verb after the pronoun is generally omitted for the sake of brevity. 

The first ‘Incorrect’ form is often used in spoken English. It is now acceptable English. In that case, ‘than’ is regarded as a preposition.

Common errors in English: Usage of To be pronoun(subject form)

To be + Pronoun (subject form)


Incorrect : It was him. 


Correct : It was he.


Note: The pronoun after a ‘to be’ verb must be in the subject form, and not in the object form. In informal conversational English we often say. “It’s me". But this sentence is grammatically wrong and hence unacceptable in formal written composition.

Common errors in English: Usage of Plural possessive.

Plural Possessives 


Incorrect : This is a girl's school. 


Correct : This is a girls' school. 


Incorrect . We enjoyed two week's holiday. 


Correct: We enjoyed two weeks' holiday. 


Note: When the noun is singular, its possessive form is formed by adding 's to it. But in case of a plural noun ending with s, only an apostrophe is used after the finals.

Common errors in English: Usage of Possessive forms.

Possessive forms


Incorrect . That room's windows are open. 


Correct : The windows of that room are open.


Note: The possessive form is used for persons and animals only. But there are many exceptions to this rule. 


For example:

It is a day's work only. 

We took a night's rest. 

We enjoyed a week's holiday. 

Dhaka's population is very big. 

That was the court's decision. 

All the boat's crew were drowned.

Common errors in English: Usage of Pronounce for neuter gender her/him.

Pronouns for neuter gender


Incorrect : The door is open; please shut her. 


Correct : The door is open; please shut it.


Incorrect: The book is good; you should read him. 


Correct: The book is good; you should read it.


Note: In English only persons and animals are of masculine or feminine gender. Things without life are of neuter gender and take the pronoun it in the singular. But when inanimate objects are personified, they take masculine or feminine pronouns. 


For example: 

Death lays his icy hands on all. 

Bangladesh is a small country but her population is very big.

Common errors in English: Usage of past tense.

 Past tense + Past tense


Incorrect : I requested him to come but he does not. 


Correct : I requested him to come but he did not.


Note: The past tense and the present tense should not be mixed up. If you begin anything with the past tense, you should keep the same tense all through. In a composition also, you should maintain this rule.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past Simple wish.

Wish + Past simple


Incorrect : I would wish to be a bird.


Correct : I wish I were/was a bird.


Note: In sentences like this ‘were’ is more common than ‘was’. ‘Was’ is used in British informal English. But in American English it would be considered bad English to use was in this type of sentence.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past Simple As if.

As if + past simple


Incorrect . He talks as if he knows everything. 


Correct : He talks as if he knew everything.


Incorrect : She spends as if she is very rich. 


Correct : She spends as if she were very rich.


Note: The phrase ‘as if’ is followed by the past simple tense. In case of the ‘to be’ verb, whatever may be the subject the form ‘were’ is usually used.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past Perfect Would have.

 Past Perfect + Would have


Incorrect : If she would invite me, I would have gone there.


Correct : If she had invited me, I would have gone there.


Incorrect : If you took this medicine, you could have died. 


Correct : If you had taken this medicine, you could have died.


Note: An ‘impossible’ condition referring to an unrealistic past action (an action which actually did not happen in the past) is expressed by the past perfect tense and in this case the principal clause contains would, could or might followed by the perfect infinitive. The sentence ‘If he had been well, he would have attended the meeting’ means that he was not well and so he did not attend the meeting.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past simple would,could,might .

Past Simple+ would/could/might


Incorrect : If he would ask me, I would Stay. 


Correct : If he asked me, I would stay.


Incorrect : If I would be able, I could help him. 


Correct : If I were able, I could help him.


Note: An ‘improbable’ condition referring to an unrealistic future action is expressed by the past simple tense and in this case the principal clause contains would, could or might followed by a simple bare infinitive. As a matter of fact, the past tense here does not indicate any time but a very low degree of probability. The action referred to in this kind of conditional sentence is very unlikely to happen.

Common errors in English: Usage of Present Simple/Future simple rain

Present Simple+ Future Simple


Incorrect : If it will rain tomorrow, I shall not go to college.


Correct . If it rains tomorrow, I shall not go to college.


Note : If we talk about a realistic future event in a conditional sentence, the conditional clause should be in the present simple and the principal clause in the future simple tense. In place of ‘shall/will’ in the principal clause, other modals like can, may or must can also be used. 


For example:

If she invites me, I can/may/must attend the party.


However, the 'if' clause may also be in the future tense if you make a request. 


For example:

I shall be grateful if you will lend me some money.

Common errors in English: Usage of Future Simple/Present Simple shall,will,finish.

 Future Simple + Present Simple


Incorrect : I shall see you when I shall come back. 


Correct : I shall see you when I come back.


Incorrect : He will take a bath before he will take his lunch. 


Correct : He will take a bath before he takes his lunch.


Incorrect : She will talk with you after she will finish her dinner. 


Correct : She will talk with you after she finishes her dinner.


Note : When we refer to two future actions, we use the future tense in the principal clause and the present simple tense in the subordinate time clause.

Common errors in English: Usage of Past simple had.

 Past Simple


Incorrect: He had finished the work yesterday.


Correct: He finished the work yesterday.


Note: When we refer to only one past action, we should put it in the past simple tense, not in the past perfect tense. 

Common errors in English: Usage of past perfect/past simple Left.

 Past perfect + Past Simple


Incorrect : The train left before I reached the Station. 


Correct : The train had left before I reached the station.


Note: When we refer to two consecutive past actions in the same sentence using the conjunction ‘before’ or ‘after’, the action which was completed first is put in the past perfect tense and the second action is put in the past indefinite tense. 


Incorrect : I reached the station after the train left. 


Correct : I reached the station after the train had left.- 

Common errors in English: Usage of Used to.

“Used to” has no present form


Incorrect . He uses to go to bed early. 


Correct . He goes to bed early. Or He is used/accustomed to going to bed early.


Note: The modal ‘used to’ has no present form. That is why, ‘to use’ does not express a present habit, although ‘used to’ expresses a past habitual action. We can say:


He used to go to bed early.

Common errors in English: Usage of present simple I am.

Present Simple

Incorrect : I am taking a walk every morning. 


Correct : I take a walk every morning.


Note: We need the simple present to express a present habitual action. However it is correct to say:


He is always watching television.

Common errors in English: Usage of Present continous.

 Present Continuous 


Incorrect . The baby sleeps. Don't disturb him. 


Correct: The baby is sleeping. Don't disturb him.


Note: We must use the present continuous tense for any action which is in progress when the speaker is speaking. The present continuous tense is also used for actions that will take place in the near future. 


For example:

He is leaving for England soon. 

She is coming here next week.

Common errors in English: Usage of Since.

 Present Tense + Past tense with 'Since'


Incorrect : Ten years passed since he died. Or Ten years are passing since he died. 


Correct : Ten years have passed since he died. Or It is ten years since he died. 


Note: Formal English demands that we should use the present perfect tense with a ‘since’ clause of time.

However, the present simple tense like ‘It is ten years’ is used in informal style.

Common errors in English: Usage of know and been..

Stative verbs in Present Perfect Tense


Incorrect : I know him for a long time. Or I have been knowing him for a long time. 


Correct: I have known him for a long time.


Note: When we talk of an action which began in the past but continues into the present, we usually use the present perfect continuous tense. But in case of a stative verb, we must use the present perfect tense. See another example below:

Incorrect : I am here for two years. Or I have been being here for two years. 


Correct : I have been here for two years.

Common errors in English: Usage of Belong, Like,Hating.

 “Belong", “Like” etc not in -ing form


Incorrect : This book is belonging to me. 

Correct : This book belongs to me.


Incorrect: I am not liking her. 

Correct : I don’t like her.


Incorrect : I am hating you. 

Correct : I hate you.


Note: Stative verbs like Iove, hate, like, and dislike cannot be used in any progressive aspect. When present continuous is impossible, we should use the present indefinite tense.

Common errors in English: Usage of just.

 ‘Just’ in Present Perfect


Incorrect : The clock just struck. 


Correct : The clock has just struck.


Note: When we talk about an action just completed or finished, we must use the present perfect instead of the past tense.

Common errors in English: Usage of Has.

Present Perfect 

Incorrect : The roads are under water. It rained very hard.

Correct : The roads are under Water. It has rained very hard.

Note: When we talk about the result of a past action rather than the action itself, we should use the present perfect tense.

Common errors in English: Usage of visited.


Past tense for past action


Incorrect : I have visited him yesterday. 


Correct : I visited him yesterday. 


Note: When we talk of an action that was completed in the past at a stated time, we always should use the past

tense, not the present perfect tense. The present perfect tense does not have a past time reference.

Common errors in English: Usage of Lifted..

To + base form


Incorrect : He tried to lifted the box. 


Correct : He tried to lift the box.


Note: In every tense the infinitive sign ‘to’ is followed by the base form of a verb.

Common errors in English: Usage of Have and had

Have/Had + past participle


Incorrect : I have wrote a letter to her. 


Correct : I have written a letter to her.


Incorrect : He had went there. 


Correct : He had gone there.


Note: The auxiliary verb ‘have’ is not followed by the past simple form of the main verb. It takes the past participle form.

Common errors in English: Usage of I Must.

‘Had to’ for past obligation


Incorrect : I must go there yesterday. 


Correct : I had to go there yesterday.


Note: ‘Had to’ is the past form of ‘must’ when it is used to express obligation. But ‘must’ can indicate the past tense in the indirect speech. 


For example:

He said that he must do it.

Common errors in English: Usage of Modal/Infinitive do and rain.

Modal + perfect infinitive


Incorrect : You should do it yesterday. 


Correct : You should have done it yesterday.


Incorrect: It might rain last night. 


Correct . It might have rained last night.


Note: Some modals appear to have past tense forms (could, should, might) but these are not usually used with a past meaning in a simple sentence. These verbs are followed by a perfect infinitive to talk about the past. One exception is ‘could’ which can be used with a past meaning with a past time reference. 


For example:

I could swim at the age of five.

Common errors in English: Usage of modal/infinitive s/es or ed.

 Modal + infinitive


Incorrect: He can speaks English fluently. 


Correct : He can speak English fluently.


Incorrect : They could not finished the work yesterday.


Correct : They could not finish the work yesterday.


Note: Modals are not followed by the 's/es’ or ‘ed' form of other verbs.

Common errors in English: Usage of Modal/infinitive to and ought.

 Modal + infinitive


Incorrect : It may to rain tonight. 


Correct : It may rain tonight.


Incorrect : You should to obey your parents.


Correct : You should obey your parents.


Incorrect : You ought obey your parents.


Correct : You ought to obey your parents.


Incorrect : He used visit me regularly. 


Correct : He used to visit me regularly.


Note: Most modals are followed by the infinitive of other verbs without ‘to’. Only ‘ought’ and ‘used’ are exceptions. These two modals are followed by a to-infinitive.

Common errors in English: Usage of Can and will.

Can, will etc has no e/es form

Incorrect : He cans walk now. 


Correct : He can walk now.


Incorrect : The girl wills come here.


Correct : The girl will come here.


Note : A modal verb does not have 's/es’ in the third person singular.

Common errors in English: Usage Did/Bare Finish and went.

Did + bare infinitive


Incorrect : Did you finished the work yesterday? 


Correct : Did you finish the work yesterday?


Incorrect : He did not went there.


Correct : He did not go there.


Note : The auxiliary verb ‘did’ is not followed by the past simple form of the main verb. The main verb in this case will be a bare infinitive.

Common errors in English: Usage of Does/Bare take and rain.

Does + bare infinitive


Incorrect : Does he takes a bath every day? 


Correct : Does he take a bath every day?


Incorrect : It does not rains here regularly. 


Correct : It does not rain here regularly.


Note: The auxiliary verb "does” is not followed by the s/es form of the main verb. The main verb here will be a bare infinitive. 

Common errors in English: Usage of Harm to.

Harm in + gerund


Incorrect : There is no harm to go there. 


Correct : There is no harm in going there.

Common errors in English: Usage of Look Forward to.

Look forward to + gerund


Incorrect : I am looking forward to hear from you. 


Correct : I am looking forward to hearing from you.


Note: "To hear” is an infinitive phrase but “to hearing” is a prepositional phrase.

Common errors in English: Usage of Point to.

Point + of + gerund


Incorrect: What's the point to lock all the doors?


Correct : What's the point of locking all the doors? 

Common errors in English: Usage of No use to.

No use + gerund


Incorrect : It's no use to cry. 

Correct : It's no use crying.

Common errors in English: Usage of Pleasure to.

Pleasure + of + gerund


Incorrect : I had the pleasure to meet your parents.


Correct : I had the pleasure of meeting your parents.

Common errors in English: Usage of Difficulty to.

Difficulty + in + gerund


There are certain expressions which are never followed by the infinitive. They always take a gerund after them.


Incorrect: I have no difficulty to do it. 


Correct : I have no difficulty in doing it.

Common errors in English: Usage of Busy/Worth to.

Busy/worth + gerund


Some adjectives are also followed by a gerund. 


For example:

Incorrect: He was busy to read. 


Correct : He was busy reading.


Incorrect: This food is not worth to eat. 


Correct : This food is not worth eating.

Common errors in English: Usage of Stop to.

Stop/Give up + gerund


Incorrect : The wind stopped to blow. 


Correct : The wind stopped blowing.


Incorrect : He gave up to smoke. 


Correct : He gave up smoking.


Note: ‘He stopped smoking’ means that he stopped the act of smoking. But when we mean to say that he stopped doing another thing in order to smoke, it is possible to say:

He stopped to smoke.


Here the infinitive indicates a purpose. However, the verb ‘cease’ may be followed by either an infinitive or a gerund. 


For example:

She ceased to play the piano. 

She ceased playing the piano. 

Common errors in English: Usage of Risk to.

Risk + gerund


Incorrect . We can't risk to leave her alone in the house.


Correct . We can't risk leaving her alone in the house.

Common errors in English: Usage of Practice to.

Practice + gerund

Incorrect : You should practice to speak English. 


Correct : You should practice speaking English.

Common errors in English: Usage of Mind to.

Mind ( = to object) + gerund


Incorrect : Would you mind to close the door? 


Correct : Would you mind closing the door?- 

Common errors in English: Usage of Go on to.

Go on (= to continue) + gerund


Incorrect : He went on to read the play. 


Correct : He went on reading the play. 


Note: ‘Keep on’ is also followed by a gerund. 


For example:

She kept on dancing.

Common errors in English: Usage of Finish to.

Finish + gerund


Incorrect : Have you finished to eat? 


Correct : Have you finished eating?


Note: But the verbs ‘start’ and ‘begin’ may be followed either by the gerund or the infinitive. 


For example:

He began/started to walk. 

He began/started walking.

Common errors in English: Usage of Excuse to.

Excuse + ing 


Incorrect: Please excuse me to be late.


Correct: Please excuse my being late. 

Or

Please excuse me for being late.

Common errors in English: Usage of Enjoy to.

Enjoy + gerund


Incorrect: I enjoyed to read the book. 


Correct: I enjoyed reading the book.


Note: But the verbs ‘like’ or ‘dislike’ may be followed by either the to-infinitive or the gerund. 


For example:


I like to read novels. 

Or 

I like reading novels.

Common errors in English: Usage of Avoid to.

Avoid + gerund


There are certain verbs which are always followed by the present participle form of a verb (or gerund) and not by an infinitive.


Incorrect: You should avoid to make mistakes. 


Correct : You should avoid making mistakes. 


Incorrect : I could not help ( = could not avoid) to laugh. 


Correct : I could not help laughing.


Note: But when ‘help’ means ‘assist’, it may be followed by a bare infinitive or to-infinitive. 


For example: 


I helped him write the application. 

Or  

I helped him to write the application.

Common errors in English: Usage of Used to.

Used + to + gerund


Incorrect . He is used to smoke. 


Correct : He is used to smoking. 


Note: In this correct sentence ‘used’ is an adjective and ‘to’ is a proposition. But when ‘used’ is used as a modal, it is followed by an infinitive. 


For example: 

He used to smoke.

Common errors in English: Usage of Tried to.

Tired + of + gerund 


Incorrect : He is tired to wait.


Correct . He is tired of waiting.

Common errors in English: Usage of think to.

Think + of + gerund  


Incorrect . I often think to visit her. 


Correct : I often think of visiting her.

Common errors in English: Usage of suceed to.

Succeed + in + gerund 


Incorrect: He succeeded to cross the river. 


Correct . He succeeded in crossing the river. 

Common errors in English: Usage of prevent to.

Prevent + from + gerund


Incorrect : She prevented me to go there. 


Correct : She prevented me from going there. 

Common errors in English: usage of Objection to.

Objection + to + gerund 


Incorrect : I have no objection to walk.


Correct : I have no objection to walking.


Note: In the incorrect sentence here ‘to’ is a sign of the infinitive but in the correct sentence ‘to’ is a preposition.

Common errors in English : usage of insist to.

Insist + on + gerund 


Incorrect : He insisted to go abroad. 


Correct : He insisted on going abroad.

Common errors in English : Usage of Fond to.

Fond + of + gerund


Incorrect . She is very fond to talk. 


Correct : She is very fond of talking.

Common errors in English: Usage of capable/ incapable of

Capable/incapable + of + gerund 


There are words which regularly take a preposition after them and that preposition may be followed by a gerund, not by an infinitive. 


Incorrect: He is quite capable to do that. 


Correct : He is quite capable of doing that.


Incorrect : She is incapable to tell a lie. 


Correct : She is incapable of telling a lie.


Note: But the adjective ‘able/unable’ is followed by the infinitive. 


Incorrect . He is able to walking now. 


Correct : He is able to walk now. 

Common errors in English: Usage of In spite of.

In spite of + gerund


Incorrect . In spite of work hard, he failed the exam.


Correct . In spite of working hard, he failed the exam.


Note: A preposition may be a single word or a group of words.

Common errors in English: Usage of Instead of.

Instead of + gerund 


Incorrect : He went away instead of to wait. 


Correct : He went away instead of waiting.

Common errors in English: Usage of without to.

Without + gerund 


Incorrect : Do your work without to speak.


Correct : Do your work without speaking.


Note: A preposition is always followed by a noun or anything equivalent to a noun. But it cannot be followed by an infinitive. If a verb form has to be used after a preposition, it must be in the present

participle (or gerundial) form.

Common errors in English: Usage of write by/in.

Write


When an instrument is used for writing, we use ‘with’ before that instrument but when we mean the marks made by an instrument we use ‘in’.


Incorrect . He wrote the letter by a pen. 


Correct : He wrote the letter with a pen.


Incorrect : She wrote the letter with ink. 


Correct : She wrote the letter in ink.


Similarly, we can say:


He is writing in chalk on the board. 

Or 

He is writing with a piece of chalk. 


We can also say: 


The boy is writing in pencil. 

Or 

The boy is writing with a pencil.

Common errors in English: Usage of warn with/of.

Warn


Incorrect : She was warned with/about the danger. 


Correct : She was warned of the danger.


Incorrect : I warned him of his disobedience. 


Correct : I warned him against his disobedience.


Note: We warn a person of a danger, but against a fault.

Common errors in English: Usage of treamble in.

Tremble (= shake/shiver)


Incorrect . He was trembling in/from cold. 


Correct . He was trembling with cold.


Note: ‘Shake’ and ‘shiver’ are also followed by ‘with’. 


For example:


The thief was shaking with fear. 

The boys are shivering with cold.

Common errors in English: Usage of Translate to.

Translate


Incorrect : Translate this passage to Bangla.


Correct : Translate this passage into Bangla. 


Note: The verb 'turn’ is also followed by ‘into’.


Incorrect : Water turns to ice when it freezes. 


Correct : Water turns into ice when it freezes.

Common errors in English: Usage of tried from/with.

 Tired


Incorrect : I am tired from walking. 


Correct : I am tired with walking.


Incorrect: Runa is tired with boiled eggs.


Correct : Runa is tired of boiled eggs.

Common errors in English:usage of tie with.

Tie (= bind) 


Incorrect: The horse was tied with a tree. 


Correct : The horse was tied to a tree. 


Note: Similarly, ‘bind’ is also followed by ‘to’. 


For example: 

He was bound to the stake. 

Common error in English: A and An

 If the word following begins with a vowel sound, the word you want is “an”: “Have an apple, Adam.” If the word following begins with a consonant, but begins with a vowel sound, you still need “an”: “An X-ray will show whether there’s a worm in it.” It is nonstandard and often considered sloppy speech to utter an “uh” sound in such cases.

The same rule applies to initialisms like “NGO” (for “non-governmental organization”). Because the letter N is pronounced “en,” it’s “an NGO” but when the phrase is spoken instead of the abbreviation, it’s “a non-governmental organization.”

When the following word definitely begins with a consonant sound, you need “a”: “A snake told me apples enhance mental abilities.”

Note that the letter Y can be either a vowel or a consonant. Although it is sounded as a vowel in words like “pretty,” at the beginning of words it is usually sounded as a consonant, as in “a yolk.”

Words beginning with the letter U which start with a Y consonant sound like “university” and “utensil” also take an “a”: “a university” and “a utensil.” But when an initial U has a vowel sound, the word is preceded by “an”: it’s “an umpire,” “an umbrella,” and “an understanding.”

Reference: www.brains.wsu.edu

Common errors in English: usage of suspect for/with.

Suspect (= doubt)

Incorrect : I suspect him for stealing my camera. 

Correct : I suspect him of stealing my camera.

Note: The adjective form 'suspicious’ also takes ‘of’ after it. 

Incorrect . I am suspicious with her intentions. 

Correct: I am suspicious of her intentions.

Common errors in English: usage of surprised for.

Surprised (= astonished)

Incorrect: We were surprised for his reaction. 

Correct : We were surprised at/by his reaction.

Note: Some other adjectives like this are also followed by ‘at/by’. 

For example:

I was amazed at/by her beauty. 
We were astonished at/by his calmness.

Common errors in English: usage of sure for.

Sure (= certain)

Incorrect : I am sure for his success. 

Correct : I am sure of his success.

Note: The adjective ‘certain’ is followed by ‘of’ or ‘about’. 

For example:

She was quite certain of/about it.

Common errors in English: usage of superior than/from.

Superior

Incorrect : These mangoes are superior than/from those.

Correct: These mangoes are superior to those.

Note: Like 'superior’, ‘inferior', 'senior' and ‘junior’ are also followed by ‘to’. 

For example:

This rice is inferior to that. 
He is senior to me by two years. 
I am junior to him by two years.

Common errors in English: usage of Succeed at/in.

Succeed

Incorrect : He succeeded at his effort.

Correct : He succeeded in his effort.

Incorrect : After his death, his son will succeed in his property.

Correct : After his death, his son will succeed to his property.

Also: She succeeded to the throne in 1952.

Common errors in English: usage of Spend For/in.

Spend

Incorrect : He spends a lot of money for his clothes.

Correct : He spends a lot of money on his clothes.

Incorrect : They spend a lot of money in advertising.

Correct : They spend a lot of money on advertising.

Common errors in English: usage of Sit on/over.

Sit

According to different kinds of seat, the verb ‘sit’ may be followed by different prepositions.

Incorrect : He sat on his desk to work. 

Correct : He sat at his desk to work.

Incorrect : She sat down over the sofa/chair.

Correct : She sat down on the sofa/chair.

Incorrect : He was sitting on an arm-chair.

Correct : He was sitting in an arm-chair.

Common errors in English: usage of similar with/in.

Similar

Incorrect . This dress is similar with that. 

Correct . This dress is similar to that.

Note: The noun form ‘similarity’ may take ‘to’ or ‘between’ after it. 

Incorrect : There is a lot of similarity in the two poems. 

Correct . There is a lot of similarity between the two poems.

Incorrect: His poetry has similarity with yours. 

Correct : His poetry has similarity to yours.

Common errors in English: usage of Satisfied for.

Satisfied ( = pleased)

Incorrect : Are you satisfied for your result? 

Correct : Are you satisfied with your result?

Note: There are some other adjectives like this with ‘with’ after them. 

For example:

He was content with what he had.
I am delighted with my marks.
She was displeased with the message.
He was dissatisfied with that amount of money.
They were disgusted with the noise.-

Common errors in English: usage of Repent for.

Repent (= to feel sorry for any bad action)

Incorrect : He repented for his wickedness. 

Correct . He repented of his wickedness.

Note: The noun ‘repentance’ and adjective ‘repentant’ are followed by ‘for’. 

For example:

She has no repentance for her sin. 
She felt repentant for her sin.

Meaning of idiom still as a starfish

 Meaning of still like/ as starfish: Motionless like starfish

When a person is not moving and remains still at one place then we can say to him " you are still as a starfish"

Tags: Meaning and usage of idiom and phrase " Still as a starfish"


Common errors in English: usage of Related with.

Related ( = connected by a family relationship)

Incorrect: I am related with her by marriage. 

Correct : I am related to her by marriage.

Note: The noun form ‘relation’ may be followed by ‘between’ and ‘to’. 

For example: 

What is the relation between you two? 

Is he any relation to you?

Common errors in English: usage of Proud for.

Proud

Incorrect: He is very proud for his new car. 

Correct : He is very proud of his new car.

Note: The noun form ‘pride’ is followed by ‘in’.

For example : 

He takes great pride in his son.

Common errors in English: usage of Preside in.

Preside

Incorrect : Who will preside in the meeting? 

Correct : Who will preside at/over the meeting?

Common errors in English: usage of prefer From/than.

Prefer

Incorrect: I prefer coffee from/than tea. 

Correct : I prefer coffee to tea.

Note: Preferable also takes ‘to’ after it. 

Incorrect: Death is preferable than dishonor.

Correct: Death is preferable to dishonor.

Common errors in English: usage of popular among.

Popular 

Incorrect : He is very popular among his pupils. 

Correct : He is very popular with his pupils. 

Common errors in English: usage of pleased To/for.

Pleased

Incorrect : He was pleased to/at me. 

Correct : He was pleased with me.

Incorrect : Are you pleased for your car? 

Correct : Are you pleased with your car?

Incorrect : I am pleased for his politeness.

Correct : I am pleased at/with his politeness. 

Note: ‘Pleased’ may be followed by 'at/with’ when an abstract noun follows.

Common errors in English: usage of Play with.

Play
Incorrect : He always plays with the Moha-medan.

Correct : He always plays for the Moha-medan.

Common errors in English: usage of opposite of/from.

Opposite

Incorrect : His house is opposite of/from ours.

Correct : His house is opposite to ours.

Common errors in English: usage of Married with/to.

Married

Incorrect : She was married with a doctor. 

Correct : She was married to a doctor. 

Note: Like ‘married', 'engaged’ is also followed by ‘to’.

Incorrect : Rina is engaged with Reza. 

Correct : Rina is engaged to Reza.

Common errors in English: Usage of Look to.

Look

Incorrect: Look to this beautiful picture. 

Correct : Look at this beautiful picture.

Note: This verb may be followed by many different prepositions to produce many different meanings. 

For example:

He looks after his old parents. (= take care of) 

I am looking for a job. ( = trying to find) 

Please look over this script. ( = examine) 

I shall look into the matter. (= examine closely)

He looks upon me as his brother. ( = consider) 

Python Operators: Arithmetic operators, relational operators, logical operators, bitwise operators, assignment operators, identity operators, membership operators

Python  Basic Operator

  • It is a special symbol which is used to perform logical or mathematical operation on data or variable.

Operand

  • It is a data or variable on which the operation is to be performed.

Types of Operator

  • ⇒Arithmetic Operators
  • ⇒Relational Operators
  • ⇒Logical Operators
  • ⇒Assignment Operators
  • ⇒Bitwise Operators
  • ⇒Membership Operators
  • ⇒Identity Operators

Arithmetic Operators

SymbolOperationExample
+Additionx+y
-Subtractionx-y
*Multiplicationx*y
/Divisionx/y
%Modulusx%y
**Exponent2**3=8

x=5
y=2
print("x+y=",x+y)
print("x-y=",x-y)
print("x*y=",x*y)
print("x/y=",x/y)
print("x%y=",x%y)
print("x**y=",x**y)
"""
***Output***
x+y= 7
x-y= 3  
x*y= 10
x/y= 2.5
x%y= 1
x**y= 25
"""

Relational Operators

SymbolOperationExample
==Equal to2==3 returns 0
!=Not equal to2!=3 returns 1
>Greater than2>3 returns 0
<Less than2<3 returns 1
>=Greater than or equal to2>=3 returns 0
<=Less than or equal to2<=3 returns 1

Logical Operators

(x>y)and(x>z)Here this expression returns true if both conditions are true.
(x>y)or(x>z)Here this expression returns true if any one or both conditions are true.
not(x>y)Not operator reverses the state means if the condition is true it returns false and if the condition is false it returns true.

#Show result according to percent 
x=int(input("Enter first number:"))
y=int(input("Enter second number:"))
z=int(input("Enter third number:"))
if x>y and x>z:
    print(x," is greatest")
if y>x and y>z:
    print(y," is greatest")
if z>x and z>y:
    print(z," is greatest")
"""
***Output***
Enter first number:58
Enter second number:86
Enter third number:27
86  is greatest
"""
 

Assignment Operators

SymbolExampleSame as
=x=yx=y
+=x+=yx=x+y
-=x-=yx=x-y
*=x*=yx=x*y
/=x/=yx=x/y
%=x%=yx=x%y
**=x**=yx=x**y

x1 = 9
y1 = 4
x1 += y1 #x1=x1+y1
print(x1)
x2 = 9
y2 = 4
x2 -= y2 #x2=x2-y2
print(x2)
x3 = 9
y3 = 4
x3 *= y3 #x3=x3*y3
print(x3)
x4 = 9
y4 = 4
x4 /= y4 #x4=x4/y4
print(x4)
x5 = 9
y5 = 4
x5 %= y5 #x5=x5%y5
print(x5)
x6=2
y6=3
x6**=y6 #x6=x6**y6
print(x6)
"""
***Output***
13
5
36
2.25
1
8
"""
 

Bitwise Operators

SymbolOperationExample
&Bitwise ANDx&y
|Bitwise ORx|y
<<Shift Leftx<<2
>>Shift Rightx>>2
^X-ORx^y

x=6
y=3
print("x&y=",x&y)
print("x|y=",x|y)
print("x>>2=",x>>2)
print("x<<2=",x<<2)
print("x^2=",x^2)
"""
***Output***
x&y= 2
x|y= 7
x>>2= 1
x<<2= 24
x^2= 4
"""
 
For more details click here

Membership Operators

  • These operators are used to check specified element is present in a sequence(string,list,tuples etc) or not.
  • It returns boolean values(True/False).
operatorDescription
inReturns true if it finds specified element in sequence otherwise returns false.
not inReturns true if it does not find specified element in sequence otherwise returns false.

list=["Ravi","Shyam","Ashish"]
print("Ravi" in list)#true
print("Tom" in list)#false

print("Ravi" not in list)#false
print("Tom" not in list)#true
"""
***Output***
True
False
False
True
"""


( Reference and Acknowledgement: Easy Softwares by Mr Anil Singhania)

Identity Operators

  • These operators are used to compare two objects.
  • It returns boolean values(True/False).
operatorDescription
isIt returns true if both variables are the same object otherwise returns false.
is notIt returns true if both variables are not the same object otherwise returns false.

x=10
y=10
z=20
#true because of same identity of a and y
print(x is y)
#false because of same identity of a and y
print(x is not y)
#false because a and b have not same identity
print(x is z)
#true because a and b have not same identity
print(x is not z)
"""
***Output***
True
False
False
True
"""

Reference

Easy softwares by Anil Singhania The Website of Professor Paul Brians https://brians.wsu.edu/; Common spoken English mistakes by Alif innovative solutions; 25000+ Amazing Facts - Did You Know?; IP idioms and phrases

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